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  1. We had a leisurely start to the day in Sighișoara, enjoying breakfast on the terrace and then walking to the train station, with a detour via Lidl to pick up some food for lunch. Our train to Cluj was leaving Sighișoara at 11.48, so we knew we wouldn't be able to get a proper meal until the evening. We'd opted for first class again with the train, so we had a comfortable, air-conditioned journey through the Romanian countryside, arriving in Cluj around 15.45. There hardly seemed to be any habitation between Sighișoara and Cluj at all; just occasional hamlets, where people still seem to get around by horse and cart. We're staying in an apartment in Cluj. For some reason this has turned out to be the most expensive accommodation of the holiday, at £42.50 per night. It's a really nice apartment though and we've got air conditioning in the bedroom, which is always a bonus Once we'd unpacked a bit, we went out to explore the city. Our apartment is right by this pretty square. As with everywhere we've been in Romania, we didn't have to go far to find colourful houses. We headed towards the city's central square, Piața Unirii, which is dominated by this large church. This is St Michael's church, a Catholic church built by the Hungarians in the 15th century. It's the second largest church in Transylvania, the largest being the Black Church in Brasov which we saw earlier in the week. The owner of our apartment had warned us that the main square was going to be dominated by an event for children. Sure enough, we arrived and found it full of stalls and balloons! There was also a stage with dancing gnomes. In front of the church is a large statue of a man on a horse. This is Matthias Corvinus, who was king of Hungary from 1458 to 1490, and who was born in Cluj. From the main square we caught sight of another church which looked interesting, down a side street. We wanted to go and explore that, but first we took a detour to Cluj's central park. We'd seen on our map that there was a lake in the middle of the park. There were some rather colourful boats on it As we left the park we came across a monument to people who died resisting the Communist regime in Romania. From there it wasn't far to the church we'd seen. This is Cluj's Romanian Orthodox cathedral. Work started on the building in 1923 and it was officially opened in 1933. Outside the cathedral is a large statue of Avram Iancu, a Romanian national hero. It was regarded as controversial when it was erected, because historically the population of the city was majority Hungarian. Across the road from the cathedral is a bright yellow theatre and opera building. It's a really pretty part of town overall We walked along one of the main streets, which was decorated with Romanian and EU flags. There's a statue of Romulus and Remus here too! There was still plenty going on in the main square, so we walked to a quieter side street to find somewhere to eat. We found a nice restaurant where I had spaghetti carbonara and Tim had goulash. For pudding we both ordered "lava cake", which was a warm chocolate cake with chocolate sauce in the middle, served with raspberry ripple icecream. It was getting dark by the time we'd finished eating. The main square looked pretty lit up at night... ...as did the square by where we're staying. I think we've managed to see the highlights of Cluj this afternoon, so we went back to the apartment to try and plan a day trip for tomorrow
  2. One downside of our guesthouse not being located in the town centre is that we (or, more precisely, Tim!) had a long walk to the nearest shop to buy breakfast. He did get a nice view on the way though Once he'd returned from Lidl, we sat outside on the terrace to eat breakfast and our landlady brought us coffee and homemade chocolate cake, which was a nice surprise We were able to have a relaxed start to the day because we were planning to visit the town of Mediaș, about 25 miles west of Sighișoara, and there wasn't a train until after 11am. Luckily, the train journey between the two towns is only short. We travelled through some pretty countryside, before stepping off the train in Mediaș around half an hour later. The first sight we came to when we started walking from the train station into the town was this synagogue. We've seen a lot more synagogues on this holiday than I expected! We'd chosen Mediaș for a day trip because we'd read that it had a well preserved historic centre. It did indeed look very pretty as we walked towards it. It didn't take long to reach the main square. There's a little park in the middle of the square, full of colourful flowers. Little streets lead off from here in all directions. We followed one of them, towards the edge of the old town. There we found the remnants of the old town walls. We were able to walk along the side of them for a while. We came to one of the old gates into the town... ...and went back into the main centre. There were so many colourful houses here Mediaș is believed to have been founded in 1146, making it one of the oldest towns in Romania. Again, this was historically a town that was settled by Saxons, and so it wasn't until the 19th century that the first Romanian church was built here. The big church which dominates the town is a Lutheran church. It was originally built as a Catholic church by the Transylvanian Saxons in the 15th century, but converted to a Lutheran church during the Reformation. It was built as a fortified church, in the middle of a fortress complex, and as we got closer we were able to see a big tower, known as the Trumpeter's Tower. It was so called because a trumpeter would sit at the top of it and alert the citizens of the town to approaching danger. This pretty building next to the church complex is a high school, founded by the local pastor Stephan Ludwig Roth. He upset the Hungarians by arguing against Hungarian becoming the sole official language of Transylvania and was executed in 1849. All the exploring was making us hungry, so we set off to find somewhere to get lunch. We found a nice restaurant where we could sit in the main square. I played it safe with schnitzel and chips again, but Tim was more adventurous and chose a Romanian dish. It was a pork stew, served with polenta and peasant-style potatoes. For pudding, Tim had pancakes filled with nuts and honey, while I had a chocolate brownie. Unbelievably, the entire meal (including a glass of wine for me, a beer for Tim, a bottle of water and a coffee) only came to £21. After lunch we did some more exploring. We caught sight of another tower on the opposite edge of the town to where we'd been previously. It was a really impressive tower, complete with portcullis There's a whole stretch of wall which has been restored here. Just outside the walls, we found the town's Romanian Orthodox cathedral. It was nearly time to go back to the station to catch one of the infrequent trains back to Sighișoara, but we just had time for a final stroll around. It felt like some of the houses in this part of town were competing to see who could be the most brightly coloured This blue was rather striking... ...as was this yellow... ...and with this green As we had a final walk through the main square, we realised belatedly that there is a Mediaș sign here. Admittedly not quite as impressive as the one in Brasov, but it still made for a good photo The train journey back took a little longer than expected, because the train went really slowly for no clear reason (there have been zero train announcements on any train we've travelled on during this holiday - both in Bulgaria and Romania!). But we'd paid for first class again, so we had comfy seats with air conditioning and it didn't really matter. Tomorrow we will be leaving Sighișoara and travelling to our final destination of the holiday: Cluj.
  3. This morning it was time for us to leave Brașov and travel onwards to our next destination, Sighișoara. Train timetables in Romania seem to be quite irregular, so we had a choice of an early train this morning or a late afternoon one which wouldn't get us to Sighișoara until it was almost dark. We decided to go with the earlier train, which involved us leaving our apartment at 8am this morning to walk to the train station in Brașov. We made it just on time for our train and were able to buy tickets from a machine. We went for first class again and it cost around £12 each. The first class carriage was reasonably comfortable, though the air conditioning was so cold that I wished I'd brought a jumper! It was a scenic journey of around three hours to get to Sighișoara. We travelled through miles of sparsely populated countryside, passing the occasional small town. As soon as we arrived in Sighișoara and stepped out of the train station, we got our first view of the old town in the distance. Because we'd caught the morning train, we were too early to check into our guesthouse at the moment, so we decided to walk towards the town centre to kill some time. We soon found ourselves at a bridge across the river Târnava Mare. On one side we could see the old town... ...while behind us we could see Sighișoara's Romanian Orthodox cathedral. We didn't want to walk too far with the cases, so we found a cafe just across the river where we were able to sit outside with a drink (and a nice view!) until it was time to start walking towards our guesthouse. I struggled to find accommodation in Sighișoara when I was making bookings earlier in the year, and so we've ended up staying in a small guesthouse here rather than an apartment. The place we're staying is really nice but when I booked it, it was on the basis that I thought it was within a mile of the train station. It turns out that it is... but a mile in the opposite direction from the train station compared to the rest of the town The guesthouse is on a bit of a hill, so we've got a nice view from our windows. We settled in for a while and then set off to see Sighișoara properly without our suitcases. Sighișoara is another historically Saxon town. German craftsmen and merchants came and settled in the area in the 12th and 13th centuries. Sighișoara became an important medieval city and today is a world heritage site because of its well-preserved fortified old town. As we walked towards the old town, we noticed that there were some serious traffic jams on the main roads into the town. It turned out there had been some sort of cycle race going on today (it looked like a Romanian version of the Tour de France) and so presumably the roads had been closed. There was still a lot of cycling related activity going on in the main square when we arrived, which slightly obstructed our view up towards the old town. Even with the cycling banners, the streets looked really pretty though. The fortified medieval town was built on top of a hill and is known as the citadel. We started climbing up towards it... ...and soon had a good view out across the newer part of town. We emerged at the top of the hill, near Sighișoara's city hall. From here, we wandered through the colourful streets. We passed the house where Vlad Dracul, the father of Vlad the Impaler who inspired the character Dracula, was born. There are lots of towers in the town, but the most impressive one is this huge clock tower. This was historically the main gate to the city. The tower also used to serve as Sighișoara's town hall. It's got a very elaborate clock face with figures which looked like they might do something when the clock struck the hour, but we just missed it. From the clock tower we emerged into a really colourful square. This white building is known as the Stag House, because of the stag's head attached to its facade. Down this little street we found the town's Catholic church. It was built by the Hungarians, who have also historically been an important minority in the town. The historical defence system in Sighișoara was organised so that each guild was responsible for defending a tower. This was the bootmakers' tower... ..this one, hiding slightly behind a tree, was the tinsmiths' tower... ...and this one was the ropemakers' tower. This building isn't a tower, but it has a really unusual roof! As we wandered through the streets, we realised that we weren't actually at the top of the hill after all. To get right to the top, you have to use this staircase, known as the Scholars' Staircase. It's an extremely steep staircase, originally built in 1642 to allow people to reach the school and church at the top of the hill more easily during winter, when snow made other routes slippery. The school is right at the top of the staircase. We were rather out of breath by the time we got there. There's also a large church on the hilltop. This is, appropriately enough, called the Church on the Hill Work started on a church here in 1429 and today it's apparently the third largest church in Transylvania. We spent a while walking around the hill top... ...and enjoying the views. Then it was back off down the stairs again! We found a nice restaurant in the square where we could sit outside and get dinner. I had chicken schnitzel with chips, while Tim had Hungarian goulash, and we shared a bottle of Romanian wine. For pudding, Tim had an apple crumble and I had chocolate pancakes It was a lovely place to sit outside After dinner we climbed back down out of the old town. The more modern part of town at the bottom of the steps was pretty too... ...and there were still plenty of colourful houses here We found another Romulus and Remus statue. This definitely seems to be a thing in Romania! The walk back to the guesthouse (the orange building below) didn't feel quite as long now we knew where we were going. And when we got in, we found that our hosts had left us shots of a Romanian spirit to try Not sure what it's called; it tastes a bit like Croatian rakija and it's very strong!
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