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Found 3 results

  1. This morning it was time for us to leave Brașov and travel onwards to our next destination, Sighișoara. Train timetables in Romania seem to be quite irregular, so we had a choice of an early train this morning or a late afternoon one which wouldn't get us to Sighișoara until it was almost dark. We decided to go with the earlier train, which involved us leaving our apartment at 8am this morning to walk to the train station in Brașov. We made it just on time for our train and were able to buy tickets from a machine. We went for first class again and it cost around £12 each. The first class carriage was reasonably comfortable, though the air conditioning was so cold that I wished I'd brought a jumper! It was a scenic journey of around three hours to get to Sighișoara. We travelled through miles of sparsely populated countryside, passing the occasional small town. As soon as we arrived in Sighișoara and stepped out of the train station, we got our first view of the old town in the distance. Because we'd caught the morning train, we were too early to check into our guesthouse at the moment, so we decided to walk towards the town centre to kill some time. We soon found ourselves at a bridge across the river Târnava Mare. On one side we could see the old town... ...while behind us we could see Sighișoara's Romanian Orthodox cathedral. We didn't want to walk too far with the cases, so we found a cafe just across the river where we were able to sit outside with a drink (and a nice view!) until it was time to start walking towards our guesthouse. I struggled to find accommodation in Sighișoara when I was making bookings earlier in the year, and so we've ended up staying in a small guesthouse here rather than an apartment. The place we're staying is really nice but when I booked it, it was on the basis that I thought it was within a mile of the train station. It turns out that it is... but a mile in the opposite direction from the train station compared to the rest of the town The guesthouse is on a bit of a hill, so we've got a nice view from our windows. We settled in for a while and then set off to see Sighișoara properly without our suitcases. Sighișoara is another historically Saxon town. German craftsmen and merchants came and settled in the area in the 12th and 13th centuries. Sighișoara became an important medieval city and today is a world heritage site because of its well-preserved fortified old town. As we walked towards the old town, we noticed that there were some serious traffic jams on the main roads into the town. It turned out there had been some sort of cycle race going on today (it looked like a Romanian version of the Tour de France) and so presumably the roads had been closed. There was still a lot of cycling related activity going on in the main square when we arrived, which slightly obstructed our view up towards the old town. Even with the cycling banners, the streets looked really pretty though. The fortified medieval town was built on top of a hill and is known as the citadel. We started climbing up towards it... ...and soon had a good view out across the newer part of town. We emerged at the top of the hill, near Sighișoara's city hall. From here, we wandered through the colourful streets. We passed the house where Vlad Dracul, the father of Vlad the Impaler who inspired the character Dracula, was born. There are lots of towers in the town, but the most impressive one is this huge clock tower. This was historically the main gate to the city. The tower also used to serve as Sighișoara's town hall. It's got a very elaborate clock face with figures which looked like they might do something when the clock struck the hour, but we just missed it. From the clock tower we emerged into a really colourful square. This white building is known as the Stag House, because of the stag's head attached to its facade. Down this little street we found the town's Catholic church. It was built by the Hungarians, who have also historically been an important minority in the town. The historical defence system in Sighișoara was organised so that each guild was responsible for defending a tower. This was the bootmakers' tower... ..this one, hiding slightly behind a tree, was the tinsmiths' tower... ...and this one was the ropemakers' tower. This building isn't a tower, but it has a really unusual roof! As we wandered through the streets, we realised that we weren't actually at the top of the hill after all. To get right to the top, you have to use this staircase, known as the Scholars' Staircase. It's an extremely steep staircase, originally built in 1642 to allow people to reach the school and church at the top of the hill more easily during winter, when snow made other routes slippery. The school is right at the top of the staircase. We were rather out of breath by the time we got there. There's also a large church on the hilltop. This is, appropriately enough, called the Church on the Hill Work started on a church here in 1429 and today it's apparently the third largest church in Transylvania. We spent a while walking around the hill top... ...and enjoying the views. Then it was back off down the stairs again! We found a nice restaurant in the square where we could sit outside and get dinner. I had chicken schnitzel with chips, while Tim had Hungarian goulash, and we shared a bottle of Romanian wine. For pudding, Tim had an apple crumble and I had chocolate pancakes It was a lovely place to sit outside After dinner we climbed back down out of the old town. The more modern part of town at the bottom of the steps was pretty too... ...and there were still plenty of colourful houses here We found another Romulus and Remus statue. This definitely seems to be a thing in Romania! The walk back to the guesthouse (the orange building below) didn't feel quite as long now we knew where we were going. And when we got in, we found that our hosts had left us shots of a Romanian spirit to try Not sure what it's called; it tastes a bit like Croatian rakija and it's very strong!
  2. It was another bright sunny day when we woke up in Brașov this morning We didn't need to go far from our apartment before we caught sight of the Brașov sign on the hills behind the town. The glimpse we'd got of Brașov while out getting food last night suggested that it was going to be a really pretty place. Brașov is the seventh largest city in Romania. Historically, it was the capital of the Transylvanian Saxons. The Saxons began to settle in Transylvania from the 12th century. They originally came to help defend the borders of what was, at the time, the Hungarian kingdom, but they soon became involved in mining and trading too, and built fortified settlements all over the region. Transylvania was unified with Romania after the First World War, and from this point the German population began to decline. There must also have been a significiant Jewish population in Brașov at some point, because we found a very elaborate synagogue. You can't really see it in the photo, but it had really pretty stained glass. We caught sight of turrets in the distance and went to investigate. It turns out that this white turreted building used to be the main gate into the city in medieval times. However, in the 19th century a new (bigger) gate was built in order to allow in more traffic. From the gate we walked towards the town's main square. We were confronted by an absolutely enormous church. This is the Biserica Neagră (the Black Church), a Gothic Lutheran church which was built by the German community. It's so large you have to get quite a long way away from it to fit it all in a photo! The church sits in Piața Sfatului. The centre of the square is dominated by this large building, which used to be the town's council house. Today it houses a history museum. The entire square is so beautiful that it was difficult to know in which direction to look first All sides of the squares are lined with colourful buildings. There were some interesting churches too. And, of course, we could see up to the Brașov sign above the town. We left the main square and explored some of the side streets. There were even more colourful houses here On the edge of the old town we found a park. There were some very unusual flower displays here; this one looked like a peacock with a tail of flowers. There were also some attractive buildings in this more modern part of the town. And we found what looks like another Romulus and Remus statue. We'd read in the guidebook that there is a cable car up the mountain behind the town, so we set off to try to find it. We climbed up a steep road, followed by some staircases, on the edge of the town and into the woods, where we found the cable car station. It only cost 18 lei each (£3.40) for a return trip. Admittedly, when we got to the top there wasn't much of a view initially, because everywhere was so forested. We followed a sign which indicated a 10 minute walk to a viewpoint... and before we knew what was happening, we realised we were behind the Brașov sign! It was really cool to see it from the other side! Once we walked past the sign, we found there was a small viewpoint jutting out over the trees. It was quite busy so we had to wait our turn for photos. It was worth it, though; the views of the town were spectacular. We could see right town to the central square where we'd been this morning There didn't seem to be a lot further you could walk on the top of the hill, unless you wanted to walk all the way back down to Brașov, so we went back towards the cable car station, where there was a small cafe. Tim decided to sample some of the local beers. The cable car was quite busy, but we managed to get positioned near the front for the ride back down From the bottom cable car station, we went for a stroll through the woods on the edge of the town. There were some lovely views from here as well. We could see bits of the old town walls... ...as well as back towards the Black Church in the centre of town. There were some interesting buildings as we came back down into the town too. Even the town's tennis courts seemed to be surrounded by historic buildings. We also found a church with a beautiful silver roof. We set off back down the colourful streets towards our apartment, where we wanted to cool off for a bit. In the evening we set out again, in search of some food. We made our way to the main square, where there were lots of places to eat. It was really cool to see the Brașov sign again now that we'd been standing behind it We could see the cable car station and where we'd walked too. We found a restaurant with a great view to have dinner I had lasagne and Tim had rigatoni... ...followed by tiramisu It's definitely one of the most scenic views we've had dinner to, and a great end to our time in Brașov
  3. Today we were due to leave Bucharest and head north towards the town of Brașov. However, Romanian train timetables seem quite irregular and so our train wasn't leaving Bucharest until the afternoon. That meant we had time to do a bit more sight-seeing in Bucharest, and there was one more sight which I particularly wanted to see but which we hadn't managed to fit into yesterday because it's located a bit outside the city centre: Bucharest's "Arcul de Triumf". The Arcul de Triumf is located near a metro station called Aviatorilor so metro seemed like the best way to get there. We walked to Piața Romană, the metro station nearest to where we were staying, and bought our tickets. What I hadn't quite thought through was that this was a Monday morning and it seems like Bucharest's rush hour is later than we have in the UK. When the metro arrived it was extremely full and we only just managed to squeeze our way on! I hadn't expected it to be so busy, because we were travelling from the city centre to the outskirts, but it felt like a lot of people must live in the centre of town and commute to offices further out to work. Luckily we only had a couple of stops to go, so we survived the crush and were soon out in the open air at Aviatorilor. Once we were off the metro, it didn't take us long to find what we had come to see A triumphal arch was first built here in 1878, to celebrate Romanian independence. This first attempt was a wooden structure, which was eventually replaced by this more solid version in 1936. It certainly looks rather similar to the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, but Bucharest has historically been referred to as the Paris of the East, so maybe it's not too surprising Unfortunately the arch is in the middle of an extremely busy traffic junction and so we couldn't get any closer to it. While we were admiring it though, we caught sight of a church in the distance. This is the Cașin Church, which is dedicated to the archangels Michael and Gabriel. The arch is also not far away from a large park, called Herăstrău Park. Unfortunately we didn't have enough time to explore it today, but it looked like it would be pretty. We caught the metro back to our apartment, packed up our stuff and checked out, before walking a mile or so across Bucharest to the Gara de Nord. Once there, we needed to buy our train tickets to Brașov. Romania seems a bit more modern than Bulgaria and it was possible to buy the tickets from a machine rather than having to queue for a ticket desk. Having learned from our experiences in Bulgaria last week, we decided to pay for first class. I'm not sure what the price difference was, but we ended up paying 70 lei each for the journey (around £13). We found the correct platform for our train, but we were a bit early and it wasn't there yet. We were travelling over lunchtime and beginning to feel a bit peckish, so Tim paid a visit to the station McDonalds to get us something to eat on the train. We were therefore in the slightly surreal situation of sitting in Romanian first class while eating chips from brown paper bags First class was quite nice and spacious and, unlike Bulgarian trains, there was air-conditioning. The seats were laid out airline style rather than being divided into compartments, which also seemed a bit more modern. The journey from Bucharest to Brașov took just under three hours and it was an unexpectedly scenic journey, as we travelled past forests and mountains. When we arrived in Brașov we had a bit of a walk ahead of us, because the train station is a couple of miles outside the town. As we made our way down one of the main streets towards our apartment, we caught sight of a large sign on one of the hills above us. Not quite Hollywood, but still quite impressive We found our apartment and checked in. At £35.50 per night, this one was another bargain We've got a spacious kitchen/living area... ...a separate bedroom... ...and what looks like quite a posh bath. There's also a pretty good view out of our bedroom window By the time we'd settled in and gone out to get food it was getting dark, but this photo shows the hills behind where we're staying. Brașov looks like it's going to be a really pretty town and we're looking forward to exploring it properly tomorrow
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